American pioneers

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AMERICAN PIONEERS AND PATRIOTS.

DAVID CROCKETT:

HIS
LIFE AND ADVENTURES

BY
JOHN S. C. ABBOTT

ILLUSTRATED.

PREFACE.
David Crockett certainly was not a model man. But he was a representative man. He was conspicuously one of a very numerous class, still existing, and which has heretofore exerted a very powerful influence over this republic. As such, his wild and wondrous life isworthy of the study of every patriot. Of this class, their modes of life and habits of thought, the majority of our citizens know as little as they do of the manners and customs of the Comanche Indians.
No man can make his name known to the forty millions of this great and busy republic who has not something very remarkable in his character or his career. But there is probably not an adultAmerican, in all these widespread States, who has not heard of David Crockett. His life is a veritable romance, with the additional charm of unquestionable truth. It opens to the reader scenes in the lives of the lowly, and a state of semi-civilization, of which but few of them can have the faintest idea.
It has not been my object, in this narrative, to defend Colonel Crockett or to condemn him, but topresent his peculiar character exactly as it was. I have therefore been constrained to insert some things which I would gladly have omitted.
JOHN S. C. ABBOTT.
FAIR HAVEN, CONN.

CONTENTS
CHAPTER I.
Parentage and Childhood.
The Emigrant.—Crossing the Alleghanies.—The Boundless Wilderness.—The Hut on the Holston.—Life's Necessaries.—The Massacre.—Birth of David Crockett.—Peril of theBoys.—Anecdote.—Removal to Greenville; to Cove Creek.—Increased Emigration.—Loss of the Mill.—The Tavern.—Engagement with the Drover.—Adventures in the Wilderness.—Virtual Captivity.—The Escape.—The Return.—The Runaway.—New Adventures. . . . 7
CHAPTER II.
Youthful Adventures.
David at Gerardstown.—Trip to Baltimore.—Anecdotes.—He ships for London.—Disappointment.—Defrauded of his Wages.—Escapes.—NewAdventures.—Crossing the River.—Returns Home.—His Reception.—A Farm Laborer.—Generosity to his Father.—Love Adventure.—The Wreck of his Hopes.—His School Education.—Second Love adventure.—Bitter Disappointment.—Life in the Backwoods.—Third Love Adventure. . . . 35
CHAPTER III.
Marriage and Settlement.
Rustic Courtship.—The Rival Lover.—Romantic Incident. The Purchase of a Horse.—TheWedding.—Singular Ceremonies.—The Termagant.—Bridal Days.—They commence Housekeeping.—The Bridal mansion and Outfit.—Family Possessions.—The Removal to Central Tennessee.—Mode of Transportation.—The New Income and its Surroundings.—Busy Idleness.—The Third Move.—The Massacre at Fort Mimms. . . . 54
CHAPTER IV.
The Soldier Life.
War with the Creeks.—Patriotism of Crockett.—Remonstrances of hisWife.—Enlistment.—The Rendezvous.—Adventure of the Scouts.—Friendly Indians,—A March through the Forest.—Picturesque Scene.—The Midnight Alarm.—March by Moonlight.—Chagrin of Crockett.—Advance into Alabama.—War's Desolations.—Indian Stoicism.—Anecdotes of Andrew Jackson.—Battles, Carnage, and Woe. . . . 93
CHAPTER V.
Indian Warfare.
The Army at Fort Strother.—Crockett's Regiment.—Crockett at Home.—HisReenlistment.—Jackson Surprised.—Military Ability of the Indians.—Humiliation of the Creeks.—March to Florida.—Affairs at Pensacola.—Capture of the City.—Characteristics of Crockett.—The Weary March,—Inglorious Expedition.—Murder of Two Indians.—Adventures at the Island.—The Continued March.—Severe Sufferings.—Charge upon the Uninhabited Village. . . . 124
CHAPTER VI.
The Camp and the Cabin.
DeplorableCondition of the Army.—Its wanderings.—Crockett's Benevolence.—Cruel Treatment of the Indians.—A Gleam of Good Luck.—The Joyful Feast.—Crockett's Trade with the Indian.—Visit to the Old Battlefield.—Bold Adventure of Crockett.—His Arrival Home.—Death of his Wife.—Second Marriage.—Restlessness.—Exploring Tour.—Wild Adventures.—Dangerous Sickness.—Removal to the West.—His New Home. . . . 155...
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