British influence indiain

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British Influences in India
The British ruled India for almost two centuries, firstly by the British East India Company (1757-1858), followed by direct rule (1858-1947). It is inevitable that they would have left a huge influence on India, especially in government, law, language, architecture and sports.
The British colonial rule in India will always be controversial for good or bad, but itslegacy is clearly seen. For the first time in centuries, India is a single united country and the largest democracy in the world It has now the most dynamic economy after China and is about to overtake Japan as the third largest economy in terms of PPP. wow gold Its present parliamentary system, with an a fully elected lower house, and an appointed upper house is based on the British parliamentarysystem, with the president of India taking the role of the British monarch. The present judicial system of India is largely derived largely from the British system and has little correlation to the institutions of the pre-British era. It is largely based on English common law because of the long period of British colonial influence during the period of the British Raj.

Language
English is anofficial language of India, with approximately 90 millions speakers in 1991. However, it is mainly used as a second language. Given the huge number of languages in India, English serves as a useful common language for communication, especially in government, civil service and the judiciary. Indian English or South Asian English or Pigeon English or Hinglish is an informal term referring to several'incorrect' varieties of English spoken primarily in the Indian Subcontinent. Generally indicating low levels of education, these dialects evolved during and after the colonial rule of Britain in India. Several idiomatic forms, derived from Indian literary and vernacular language, also have made their way into Indian English. Despite this diversity, there is general homogeneity in syntax andvocabulary among the varieties of Indian English.
Any of the native varieties of English produce unique stresses on the language. English is a stress-timed language, and both syllable stress and word stress, where only certain words in a sentence or phrase are stressed, are important features of Received Pronunciation. Indian native languages are actually syllable-timed languages, like Latin andFrench. Indian-English speakers usually speak with a syllabic rhythm. Further, in some Indian languages, stress is associated with a low pitch, whereas in most English dialects, stressed syllables are generally pronounced with a higher pitch. Thus, when Indian speakers speak, they appear to put the stress accents at the wrong syllables, or accentuate all the syllables of a long English word. The Indianaccent is a "sing-song" accent, a feature seen in a few English dialects in Britain, such as Scouse and Welsh English.
Indian Law
When India became part of the British Empire, Hindu and Islamic law were supplanted by the common law. As a result, the present judicial system of the country derives largely from the British system and has little correlation to the institutions of the pre-Britishera. It is largely based on English common law because of the long period of British colonial influence during the period of the British Raj. Much of contemporary Indian law shows substantial European and American influence. Various legislations first introduced by the British are still in effect in their modified forms today.
During the drafting of the Indian Constitution, laws from Ireland, theUnited States, Britain, and France were all synthesized to get a refined set of Indian laws, as it currently stands. Indian laws also adhere to the United Nations guidelines on human rights law and the environmental law. Certain international trade laws, such as those on intellectual property, are also enforced in India. Indian Penal Code formulated by the British during the British Raj in 1860,...
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