Como ser analista criminal en 60 pasos

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U.S. Department of Justice Office of Community Oriented Policing Services

COPS
COMMUNITY ORIENTED POLICING SERVICES U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

CRIME ANALYSIS FOR PROBLEM SOLVERS In 6 0 S mall S teps
Ronald V. Clarke & John E. Eck

Center for Problem-Oriented Policing O

This project was supported by cooperative agreement #2003CKWXK048 by the Office of Community Oriented PolicingServices, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions contained herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the U.S. Department of Justice. References to specific companies, products, or services should not be considered an endorsement of the product by the author or the U.S. Department of Justice. Rather, the references are illustrations to supplementdiscussion of the issues.

Crime Analysis for Problem Solvers In 60 Small Steps

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Ronald V. Clarke John E. Eck

his is a revised and extended version of a manual, Become a Problem-

Solving Crime Analyst, that we wrote for the Jill Dando Institute of Crime Science at University College London,with financial support from the Home Office. We are most grateful to the Institute and to the Home Office for allowing us to produce this version for the United States. We are also grateful to the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services for commissioning the work. In the Acknowledgements page of the earlier version we thanked many colleagues and friends on whose work we had freely drawn.Those who have materially assisted us in completing this version by supplying material for inclusion, commenting on drafts, or in other ways, include: Stacy Belledin, Rachel Boba, Karen Bullock, Barbie Brookover, Christopher Bruce, Andy Brumwell, Graham Farrell, Rob Guerette, Samantha Gwinn, Shane Johnson, Johannes Knutsson, Gloria Laycock, Nancy Leach, Deborah Loewen, Tamara Madensen, MangaiNatarajan, Cynthia Pappas, Ken Pease, Nanci Plouffe, Barry Poyner, Jerry Ratcliffe, George Rengert, Nick Ross, Kim Rossmo, Rana Sampson, Matthew Scheider, Karin Schmerler, Michael Scott, Nick Tilley, Susan Wernicke, Matt White, and Deborah Lamm Weisel. We thank all of them.

Crime Analysis for Problem Solvers in 60 Small Steps

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

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RONALD V. CLARKE
Ronald Clarke isuniversity professor in the school of Criminal Justice at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and visiting professor at the Jill Dando Institute of Crime Science, University College London. He worked for many years in the Home Office Research and Planning Unit, where he contributed to the development of situational crime prevention and the British Crime Survey. He is associate director of theCenter for Problem-Oriented Policing and chair of the judges for the annual Herman Goldstein Award for Excellence in ProblemOriented Policing. He can be reached at: rclarke@andromeda.rutgers.edu.

JOHN E. ECK
John Eck is professor of criminal justice at the University of Cincinnati. He has contributed to the development of problem-oriented policing since 1984 when he studied the first full-scaleattempt to implement the concept in the United States at Newport News, Virginia. He helped to develop a number of now standard techniques in problem-oriented policing, including the SARA model and the problem analysis triangle. Dr. Eck is an affiliate member of the Center for Problem-Oriented Policing. He is a judge for the Tilley Award for Excellence in Problem-Oriented Policing. Dr. Eck was amember of the Committee to Review Research on Police Policy and Practice (2000-2003) of the National Academy of Sciences. He can be reached at: john.eck@uc.edu.

Crime Analysis for Problem Solvers in 60 Small Steps

AUTHORS

foreword

foreword
ne of the primary concerns in policing in the United States today – and for the foreseeable future – is the severe constraint on spending. The...
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