Coordinating conjunctions:

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República Bolivariana de Venezuela

Ministerio del Poder Popular para la Educación Superior

Universidad Nacional Experimental

“Simón Rodríguez”

El Tigre – Edo. Anzoátegui

English working

Realizado por:

T.S.U. Salameh, Nabil. C.I: 15.375.686T.S.U. Rucela Gómez. C.I: 19.437.529

Febrero, 2011

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Definition:

SOME WORDS ARE SATISFIED SPENDING AN EVENING AT HOME, ALONE, EATING ICE-CREAM RIGHT OUT OF THE BOX, WATCHING SEINFELD RE-RUNS ON TV, OR READING A GOOD BOOK. OTHERS AREN'T HAPPY UNLESS THEY'RE OUT ON THE TOWN, MIXING IT UP WITHOTHER WORDS; THEY'RE JOINERS AND THEY JUST CAN'T HELP THEMSELVES.
A conjunction is a joiner, a word that connects (conjoins) parts of a sentence.

Coordinating Conjunctions:

THE SIMPLE, LITTLE CONJUNCTIONS ARE CALLED COORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS.
AND BUT OR YET FOR NOR SO

(It may help you remember these conjunctions by recalling that they all have fewer thanfour letters. Also, remember the acronym FANBOYS: For-And-Nor-But-Or-Yet-So. Be careful of the words then and now; neither is a coordinating conjunction, so what we say about coordinating conjunctions' roles in a sentence and punctuation does not apply to those two words.)
When a coordinating conjunction connects two independent clauses, it is often (but not always) accompanied by a comma:• Ulysses wants to play for UConn, but he has had trouble meeting the academic requirements.
When the two independent clauses connected by a coordinating conjunction are nicely balanced or brief, many writers will omit the comma:
• Ulysses has a great jump shot but he isn't quick on his feet.
The comma is always correct when used to separate two independent clausesconnected by a coordinating conjunction. See Punctuation Between Two Independent Clauses for further help.
A comma is also correct when and is used to attach the last item of a serial list, although many writers (especially in newspapers) will omit that final comma:
• Ulysses spent his summer studying basic math, writing, and reading comprehension.
When a coordinatingconjunction is used to connect all the elements in a series, a comma is not used:
• Presbyterians and Methodists and Baptists are the prevalent Protestant congregations in Oklahoma.
A comma is also used with but when expressing a contrast:
• This is a useful rule, but difficult to remember.

AND

a. To suggest that one idea is chronologically sequential to another:"Tashonda sent in her applications and waited by the phone for a response."
b. To suggest that one idea is the result of another: "Willie heard the weather report and promptly boarded up his house."
c. To suggest that one idea is in contrast to another (frequently replaced by but in this usage): "Juanita is brilliant and Shalimar has a pleasant personality.
d. To suggest anelement of surprise (sometimes replaced by yet in this usage): "Hartford is a rich city and suffers from many symptoms of urban blight."
e. To suggest that one clause is dependent upon another, conditionally (usually the first clause is an imperative): "Use your credit cards frequently and you'll soon find yourself deep in debt."
f. To suggest a kind of "comment" on the firstclause: "Charlie became addicted to gambling — and that surprised no one who knew him."

BUT
a. To suggest a contrast that is unexpected in light of the first clause: "Joey lost a fortune in the stock market, but he still seems able to live quite comfortably."
b. To suggest in an affirmative sense what the first part of the sentence implied in a negative way (sometimes replaced...
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