Demanda

Solo disponible en BuenasTareas
  • Páginas : 2 (311 palabras )
  • Descarga(s) : 0
  • Publicado : 24 de mayo de 2011
Leer documento completo
Vista previa del texto
ArrobaFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation, search
For the @ as a character, see At sign.
The word arroba has its origin in Arabic ar-rubʿ (الربع), the fourth part (of aquintal).

Arroba was a Spanish and Portuguese customary unit of weight, mass or volume. Its symbol is @. In weight it was equal to 25 pounds (11.5 kg) in Spain, and 32 pounds (14.7 kg) in Portugal.The unit is still used in Portugal by cork merchants, and in Brazil by cattle traders. The modern metric arroba used in these country life activities is defined as 15 kilograms (33 lb).

In Peru thearroba is equivalent to 11.5 kilograms (25 lb).[1]

In Bolivia nationally it is equivalent to 30.46 litres (6.70 imp gal; 8.05 US gal). However locally there are many different values, ranging from11.5 litres (2.5 imp gal; 3.0 US gal) in Inquisivi to 16 litres (3.5 imp gal; 4.2 US gal) in Baures.[2]

[edit] See alsoPortuguese customary units
Spanish customary units
[edit] References1.^ LaRepública, En Feria de la Mujer Emprendedora presentan antibióticos naturales saludables (Spanish)
2.^ Arroba in Bolivia
This standards- or measurement-related article is a stub. You can helpWikipedia by expanding it.v · d · e
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arroba"
Categories: Units of mass | Standards and measurement stubsPersonal tools
Log in / create accountNamespacesArticleDiscussionVariantsViews
ReadEditView historyActions
Search

Navigation
Main pageContentsFeatured contentCurrent eventsRandom articleDonate to WikipediaInteractionHelpAbout WikipediaCommunityportalRecent changesContact WikipediaToolboxWhat links hereRelated changesUpload fileSpecial pagesPermanent linkCite this page
Print/exportCreate a bookDownload as PDFPrintable versionLanguagesالعربيةAragonésCatalàČeskyDeutschEspañolEuskaraFran

çais日本語PolskiPortuguêsРусскийУкраїнськаThis page was last modified on 4 December 2010 at 21:03.

Text is available under the Creative Commons...
tracking img