Greece

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  • Publicado : 24 de febrero de 2010
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Greece
Capital Athens
Official languages Greek
Government Parliamentary republic
Prime Minister George Papandreou Area
Total 131,990 km2 (96th) Population
2010 estimate 11,306,1831 Drives on the right
Greece is a country in southeastern Europe
The country has borders with Albania, the Republic of Macedonia and Bulgaria to the north, and Turkey tothe east.
Religion
The constitution of Greece recognizes the Greek Orthodox faith as the "prevailing" religion of the country, while guaranteeing freedom of religious belief for all.
Cuisine
Greek cuisine is often cited as an example of the healthy Mediterranean diet. Greek cuisine incorporates fresh ingredients into a variety of local dishes such as moussaka, stifado, Greek Salad,spanakopita and the world famous Souvlaki.
especially in the northern parts of the country, use "sweet" spices in combination with meat, for example cinnamon and cloves in stews.
Sports
Actors/actresses
Criss Angel
Jennifer Aniston
The climate of Greece can be categorised into three types (the Mediterranean, the Alpine and the Temperate)
wet winters and hot, dry summers.1. Acme
The acme of modular, factory-built, passively safe reactor design, however, is found in South Africa. People there have been experimenting with so-called pebble-bed reactors for decades. (The Economist)
2. Acropolis
Acro means edge or extremity, while polis means city. Acropolis, therefore, refers to cities that were built with security purposes in mind. The word Acropolis iscommonly associated with Greece’s capital Athens, although it can refer to any citadel, including Rome and Jerusalem.
The Beijing Olympics torch relay reached the ancient Acropolis in Athens on Saturday amid heavy police security and brief demonstrations by small groups of protesters. (New York Times)
3. Agora
The Agora was an open market place, present in most cities of the ancientGreece. Today the term can be used to express any type of open assembly or congregation.
The most characteristic feature of each settlement, regardless of its size, was a plaza—an open space that acted as a cemetery and may have been a marketplace. It was also, the archaeologists suspect, a place of political assembly, just as the agora in an ancient Greek city was both marketplace and legislature.(The Economist)
4. Anathema
Anathema is a noun and it means a formal ban, curse or excommunication. It can also refer to someone or something extremely negative, disliked or damned. Curiously enough, the original Greek meaning for this word was “something offered to the gods.”
Some thinkers argue that while collaboration may work for an online encyclopedia, it’s anathema to original worksof art or scholarship, both of which require a point of view and an authorial voice. (USA Today)
5. Anemia
Anemia refers to a condition characterized by a qualitative or quantitative deficiency of the red blood cells (or of the hemoglobin). Over the years, however, the term started to appear in other contexts, referring to any deficiency that lies at the core of a system or organization.In comments to the Dallas Morning News, Dallas Fed President Richard Fisher, the lone dissenter in last week’s decision to keep the federal funds target at 2%, said the U.S. faces “a sustained period of anemia” and that “in the second half of this year we will broach zero growth.” Last week Fisher wanted higher rates, his fifth-straight dissent in favor of tighter policy. (The Wall StreetJournal)
6. Ethos
Translated literally from the Greek, ethos means “accustomed place.” It refers to a disposition or characteristics peculiar to a specific person, culture or movement. Synonyms include mentality, mindset and values.
Consumerism needs this infantilist ethos because it favors laxity and leisure over discipline and denial, values childish impetuosity and juvenile narcissism over...
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