Hi guys just fooling around

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Foolishness is the lack of wisdom. In this sense it differs from stupidity, which is the lack of intelligence. An act of foolishness is sometimes referred to as a folly.

Foolishness and wisdom are contrasted in Paul's letter to the Corinthians. He condemns intellectual arrogance and advocates a humble attitude of foolishness in which it is then possible to learn. Plato likewise said, "He isthe wisest man who knows himself to be ill-equipped for the study of wisdom" but Paul makes a distinction between wisdom and the reason of the Greeks.[1][2]

The Fool (film)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Fool is a British film, produced and directed by Christine Edzard in 1990 from a script by Edzard and Olivier Stockman.
The plot examines the double life of a humble clerk posing asa businessman and moving in upper social circles. Its detailed evocation of life in Victorian London drew on the books of London life by Henry Mayhew.
The cast included Derek Jacobi, Cyril Cusack, Ruth Mitchell, Maria Aitken, Irina Brook, Paul Brooke, Richard Caldicot, James Cameron, Jim Carter, Jonathan Cecil, Maria Charles and Auriol Smith.
Jacobi and Cusack had previously worked with Edzardon her film adaptation of Charles Dickens Little Dorrit in 1988.
The atmospheric camerawork was by British cinematographer Robin Vidgeon.

The Fool or The Jester is one of the 78 cards in a Tarot deck; one of the 22 Trump cards that make up the Major Arcana. The Fool is unnumbered (sometime represented as 0--the first—or XXII--the last—Major Arcana in decks). It is used in divination as well asin game playing.
Contents [hide]
1 Iconography
2 History
3 In tarot games
4 Symbolism
5 Interpretations
6 Alternative decks
7 Popular culture
8 See also
9 References
10 External links
[edit]Iconography

The Fool is titled Le Mat in the Tarot of Marseilles, and Il Matto in most Italian language tarot decks. These archaic words mean "the madman" or "the beggar", and may be related tothe word for 'checkmate' in relation to the original use of tarot cards for gaming purposes.[1]
In the earliest Tarot decks, the Fool is usually depicted as a beggar or a vagabond. In the Visconti-Sforza tarot deck, the Fool wears ragged clothes and stockings without shoes, and carries a stick on his back. He has what appear to be feathers in his hair. His unruly beard and feathers may relate tothe tradition of the woodwose or wild man. Another early Italian image that relates to the tradition is the first (and lowest) of the series of the so called "Tarocchi of Mantegna". This series of prints containing images of social roles, allegorical figures, and classical deities begins with "Misero", a depiction of a beggar leaning on a staff.[2] A similar image is contained in the GermanHofamterspiel; there the fool (German: Narr) is depicted as a barefoot man in robes, apparently with bells on his hood, playing a bagpipe.[3]
The Tarot of Marseilles and related decks similarly depict a bearded person wearing what may be a jester's hat; he always carries a bundle of his belongings on a stick slung over his back. He appears to be getting chased away by an animal, either a dog or a cat.The animal has torn his pants.[4]
In the Rider-Waite Tarot deck and other esoteric decks made for cartomancy, the Fool is shown as a young man, standing on the brink of a precipice. In the Rider-Waite deck, he is also portrayed as having with him a small dog. The Fool holds a rose in one hand and in the other a small bundle of possessions.
In French suited tarot decks that do not use thetraditional emblematic images of Italian suited decks for the suit of trumps, the Fool is typically made up as a jester or bard, reminiscent of the joker in a deck of playing cards.
[edit]History

The Hermitage tells us that in the decks before Waite-Smith, the Fool is almost always unnumbered.[5] There are a few exceptions: some old decks (including the 15th-century Sola Busca and the Rider Waite)...
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