Immigration law in arizona

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  • Publicado : 11 de mayo de 2010
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Carlos Valladares
Period 7
Wed. 12, 2010
Immigration law in Arizona
Arizona became the battlefield to defend the rights of immigrants and, since the Governor Jan Brewer signed thecontroversial bill that criminalizes undocumented, protests ahead are massive.
In support of the immigrant community in Arizona, hundreds of people in several states have begun to move to that place,reports CNN.
Yesterday's demonstration was massive, the repudiation of the enactment of state law that criminalizes undocumented immigration joined opponents of the law in the State Capitol.Opponents fear that the new Arizona immigration law led police to harass legal immigrants and U.S. citizens who look Hispanic, have announced they will join the demonstrations against the measure beforethe Capitol.
By law the police can interrogate people about their immigration status, which could include require some identification if there is suspicion that the person is in the countryillegally.
The laws also increased the restrictions on hiring illegal immigrants as laborers and transport them knowingly.
In this sense, civil rights advocates vowed to face the law in court; itwill certainly say to put the sights on racial groups despite Jan Brewer offered assurances that it would not.
However, the measure's supporters dismiss such concerns by stating that the lawprohibits the use of ethnic or nationality as the sole basis for recording a person's immigration status.
Jan Brewer ordered state authorities to be offered to its employees, a training course tolearn to discern what constitutes a reasonable suspicion that someone is in the United States illegally.
According to a survey published on CBS and the newspaper 'The New York Times, 51 percentbelieve that the law is the right approach on immigration while 9 percent believe it should go even further in this matter. In front of them, 36 percent believe that Arizona has gone "too far."
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