Interational bussiness

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  • Publicado : 27 de febrero de 2012
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According to the Great Place To Work Institute (2011) sifting study the regional level, where companies are evaluated and listed with the same criteria as is done nationally, however the companies competing in the list of Multinational Enterprises, receive points pool according to the number of countries have been represented in our national rankings of Best Places to Work in the region.Consequently, multinational companies receive credits for their efforts to become a Great Place to Work for its employees in several countries.
The more countries are where a company is represented in our national lists, the greater the credit.
Multinationals that fail to join the Regional list involved with several countries, occupy a unique position. The scores of these companies are averaged andweighted by the number of employees. The consolidation of averages, only take place when there is consistency between the name of the company and share aspects of the same culture between countries.
“Size is the problem,”
McKinsey & Company, a consulting firm, says in a government funded report. Manufacturing companies are too small, too independent, and too diversified to compete in theglobal market. According to McKinsey, Denmark needs to reorganize and develop a few “industrial locomotives.” “Critical mass" in financing, access to new technology, marketing, and management experience will create these multinational companies.
In a different way Punnett (2004) says. “International strategy is the continuous and comprehensive management technique designed to help companies operateand compete effectively across national boundaries. While companies' top managers typically develop global strategies, they rely on all levels of management in order to implement these strategies successfully. The methods companies use to accomplish the goals of these strategies take a host of forms. For example, some companies form partnerships with companies in other countries, others acquirecompanies in other countries, others still develop products, services, and marketing campaigns designed to appeal to customers in other countries. Some rudimentary aspects of international strategies mirror domestic strategies in that companies must determine what products or services to sell, where and how to sell them, where and how they will produce or provide them, and how they will compete withother companies in the industry in accordance with company goals.
The development of international strategies entails attention to other details that seldom, if ever, come into play in the domestic market. These other areas of concern stem from cultural, geographic, and political differences. Consequently, while a company only has to develop a strategy taking into account known governmentalregulations, one language (generally), and one currency in a domestic market, it must consider and plan for different levels and kinds of governmental regulation, multiple currencies, and several languages in the global market.”
Recent research suggests that globalization is a myth. Far from taking place in a single global market, most business activity by large firms takes place in regional blocks.There is no uniform spread of US market capitalism, nor are global markets becoming homogenized. Government regulations and cultural differences divide the world into the triad blocks of North America, the European Union, and Japan. Rival multinational enterprises from the triad compete for regional market share and so enhance economic efficiency. As a result, top managers now need to designtriad-based regional strategies, not global ones. Only in a few sectors, such as consumer electronics, is a global strategy of economic integration viable. For most other manufacturing sectors (automobiles, for example) and for all services, strategies of national responsiveness are required, often coupled with integration strategies. The real drivers of globalization are the network managers of...
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