La evolucion de los pronombres (en ingles)

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NAME: PEDRO LOZOYA AVILA
TITLE: THE EVOLUTION OF PRONOUNS
TEACHER: ING. SALVADOR BUSTILLOS
SUBJET: INGLES 1
DATE: 14-MAR-11

INDEX

INTRODUCTION……………………………………………………….. 3

DEVELOPMENT………………………………………………………… 4

CONCLUSION…………………………………………………………… 5

INTRODUCTION

In this paper, through diachronic synchronic analysis personal pronouns of English, detailed analysis of its evolutionthrough major historical periods, where they influence decisively languages ​​like Latin and even more Scandinavian. Also presented and conclude interesting insights regarding their use and
writing.

“Pronouns considered in the light of the syntactic principles receive a special systemic status that characteristically stamps the general presentation of the structure of the lexicon as a whole.Pronouns are traditionally recognized on the basis of indicatory (deictic) and a substitutional semantic function, indication is the semantic foundation of substitution.
The generalizing substitutional function of pronouns makes them into syntactic representatives of ALL the notional classes of words, so that a pronominal positional part of the sentence serves as a categorical projection of thecorresponding notional subclass identified as the filler set of the position in question.”

DEVELOPMENT.

We must emphasize the role from the point of view syntactic-semantic use of personal pronouns in English given the analytical nature of the Germanic language in opposition to inflected (synthetic) of Spanish or other Romance languages ​​or Slavic say, in which the affixation of the verb, forexample, allows
pronominal ellipsis without this lead to problems communication.

Remember that although many English verbs have five conjugated possible variants for the lowest and highest forms of an irregular verb in English ranging from three to eight; while in Germany can reach 17 and Spanish until 24.
Most authors agree that the history of the language divide English into three periods:ancient (s. VII-XI), medium (s.XI-XV) and modern (s. XV ...). Personal pronouns of first and second persons in Old English * is characterized by
have the categories of number (singular, dual and plural), case (nominative, accusative, genitive and dative), and also gender, but nondual, for the third person singular. Their paradigms reflect the early stage of the Germanic languages old.

During theXII-XII significant changes occur personal pronoun system. Above all, it simplifies case system. This was because the forms of the genitive
All pronouns are separated into an independent group of possessive pronouns. This pronouns process began already in Old English when assimilated forms of the genitive functions show membership.

The forms of the genitive of the first and second personsingular and plural MIN, o IN, URE and EOWER and Old English were consistent in case and number with its determinants, had their own independent forms of possessive pronouns.

In the XI-XII centuries as the assimilated HIS concordance genitive number, and therefore becomes Hise. Feminine genitive forms HERE and the third person plural HIRE remained unchanged due to the presence of-e final. Probablyoccurred a fusion of forms and the dative accusative.

Shows that in all personal pronouns except HIT, the dative form replaced the accusative form, assimilating functions of the latter, leading to a new case where both functions converge and later was named objective. As a result of these changes the pronoun system personal four cases in Old English evolved bicasual fortunately, the resultremains in force until today.

During the Middle English emerged new forms of pronouns Personal: feminine third person singular and third person plural. This occurred as a result of coincidence or emergence of similarities in the ways these words sound as a result of changes in the sound system of XI-XII.

The pronoun of the third person plural at the beginning of HIE Middle English changed to...
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