Masacres

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  • Publicado : 15 de noviembre de 2011
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References:

Tovias, B. (2008) Navigating the Cultural Encounter. In A. D. Moses (Ed.), Empire, colony, genocide: Conquest, occupation, and subaltern resistance in world history (pp. 271-289). NewYork: Berghahn Books.

Theme:

Blackfoot’s cultural disintegration - Whether it is cultural genocide or assimilation.

Thesis:

The ambitions of the state certainly canvassed the disappearanceof the “Indian problem,” that is, the disappearance of First Nations as separate peoples. (pp. 289)

Route:

Introduction
2) “Civilizing” the Blackfoot
Cultural Significance of the BlackfootSun Dance
Rationale for the Sun Dance Extirpation
Measuring Genocidal Intent: Strategies to Eradicate the Sun Dance
Implementation of the Prohibition
Blackfoot Responses to Prohibition
Conclusion:Cultural Genocide or Assimilation?

Sources:

Blanca Tovias has several sources of information, however, she mostly uses Lemkin’s papers which are held at the New York Public Library.

Summary:In her article, “Navigating the Cultural Encounter,” Blanca Tovias (2008) states that the ambitions of the state certainly canvassed the disappearance of the “Indian problem,‘ that is, thedisappearance of First Nations as separate peoples (pp. 289). Tovias has several sources of information, however, she mostly uses Lemkin’s papers which are held at the New York Public Library as her primaryantecedent. She goes on to explain how the European attempted to eradicate the Sun Dance which played a key part in the Blackfoot’s culture (pp. 272). Later on she continues to explain how theBlackfoot amongst the other tribes was the most civilized because they refused to fight against the Europeans and that led them to gain the respect of the Whites (pp.276).Although, they had gained somerespect, some authorities saw the Sun Dance as a barrier to civilizing the First Nations because it gave them freedom to maintain their cultural customs (pp. 278). The Missionaries that opposed the Sun...
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