Mecánica de fluidos

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Kreith, F.; Berger, S.A.; et. al. “Fluid Mechanics” Mechanical Engineering Handbook Ed. Frank Kreith Boca Raton: CRC Press LLC, 1999

c

1999 by CRC Press LLC

Fluid Mechanics*
Frank Kreith
University of Colorado

3.1 Fluid Statics......................................................................3-2
Equilibrium of a Fluid Element ¥ Hydrostatic Pressure ¥ Manometry ¥ HydrostaticForces on Submerged Objects ¥ Hydrostatic Forces in Layered Fluids ¥ Buoyancy ¥ Stability of Submerged and Floating Bodies ¥ Pressure Variation in Rigid-Body Motion of a Fluid

Stanley A. Berger
University of California, Berkeley

Stuart W. Churchill
University of Pennsylvania

3.2 Equations of Motion and Potential Flow ......................3-11
Integral Relations for a Control Volume ¥Reynolds Transport Theorem ¥ Conservation of Mass ¥ Conservation of Momentum ¥ Conservation of Energy ¥ Differential Relations for Fluid Motion ¥ Mass ConservationÐContinuity Equation ¥ Momentum Conservation ¥ Analysis of Rate of Deformation ¥ Relationship between Forces and Rate of Deformation ¥ The NavierÐStokes Equations ¥ Energy Conservation Ñ The Mechanical and Thermal Energy Equations ¥Boundary Conditions ¥ Vorticity in Incompressible Flow ¥ Stream Function ¥ Inviscid Irrotational Flow: Potential Flow

J. Paul Tullis
Utah State University

Frank M. White
University of Rhode Island

Alan T. McDonald
Purdue University

Ajay Kumar
NASA Langley Research Center

John C. Chen
Lehigh University

3.3 Similitude: Dimensional Analysis and Data Correlation.............................................................3-28
Dimensional Analysis ¥ Correlation of Experimental Data and Theoretical Values

Thomas F. Irvine, Jr.
State University of New York, Stony Brook

Massimo Capobianchi
State University of New York, Stony Brook

3.4 Hydraulics of Pipe Systems...........................................3-44
Basic Computations ¥ Pipe Design ¥ Valve Selection ¥ PumpSelection ¥ Other Considerations

Francis E. Kennedy
Dartmouth College

3.5 Open Channel Flow .......................................................3-61
DeÞnition ¥ Uniform Flow ¥ Critical Flow ¥ Hydraulic Jump ¥ Weirs ¥ Gradually Varied Flow

E. Richard Booser
Consultant, Scotia, NY

3.6 External Incompressible Flows......................................3-70
Introduction and Scope ¥Boundary Layers ¥ Drag ¥ Lift ¥ Boundary Layer Control ¥ Computation vs. Experiment

Donald F. Wilcock
Tribolock, Inc.

3.7 Compressible Flow.........................................................3-81
Introduction ¥ One-Dimensional Flow ¥ Normal Shock Wave ¥ One-Dimensional Flow with Heat Addition ¥ Quasi-OneDimensional Flow ¥ Two-Dimensional Supersonic Flow

Robert F. Boehm
University ofNevada-Las Vegas

Rolf D. Reitz
University of Wisconsin

3.8 Multiphase Flow.............................................................3-98
Introduction ¥ Fundamentals ¥ GasÐLiquid Two-Phase Flow ¥ GasÐSolid, LiquidÐSolid Two-Phase Flows

Sherif A. Sherif
University of Florida

Bharat Bhushan
The Ohio State University
*

Nomenclature for Section 3 appears at end of chapter.

©1999 by CRC Press LLC

3-1

3-2

Section 3

3.9

Non-Newtonian Flows .................................................3-114
Introduction ¥ ClassiÞcation of Non-Newtonian Fluids ¥ Apparent Viscosity ¥ Constitutive Equations ¥ Rheological Property Measurements ¥ Fully Developed Laminar Pressure Drops for Time-Independent Non-Newtonian Fluids ¥ Fully Developed Turbulent Flow PressureDrops ¥ Viscoelastic Fluids

3.10 Tribology, Lubrication, and Bearing Design...............3-128
Introduction ¥ Sliding Friction and Its Consequences ¥ Lubricant Properties ¥ Fluid Film Bearings ¥ Dry and Semilubricated Bearings ¥ Rolling Element Bearings ¥ Lubricant Supply Methods

3.11 Pumps and Fans ...........................................................3-170
Introduction ¥ Pumps ¥ Fans...
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