Mercado

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  • Publicado : 9 de marzo de 2011
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nothing is to be achieved in war unless you are willing to take risks. T'aiKung said: "He who lets an advantage slip will subsequently bring upon himself real disaster." In 404 A.D., Liu Yu pursuedthe rebel Huan Hsuan up the Yangtsze and fought a naval battle with him at the island of Ch'eng­hung. The loyal troops numbered only a few thousands, while their opponents were in great force. But HuanHsuan, fearing the fate which was in store for him should be be overcome, had a light boat made fast to the side of his war­junk, so that he might escape, if necessary, at a moment's notice. Thenatural result was that the fighting spirit of his soldiers was utterly quenched, and when the loyalists made an attack from windward with fireships, all striving with the utmost ardor to be first in thefray, Huan Hsuan's forces were routed, had to burn all their baggage and fled for two days and nights without stopping. Chang Yu tells a somewhat similar story of Chao Ying­ch'i,a general of the ChinState who during a battle with the army of Ch'u in 597 B.C. had a boat kept in readiness for him on the river, wishing in case of defeat to be the first to get across.] (3) a hasty temper, which canbe provoked by insults; [Tu Mu tells us that Yao Hs­ ing, when opposed in 357 A.D. by Huang Mei, Teng Ch'aing and others shut himself up behind his walls and refused to fight. Teng Ch'iang said: "Ouradversary is of a choleric temper and easily provoked; let us make constant sallies and break down his walls, then he will grow angry and come out. Once we can bring his force to battle, it is doomedto be our prey." This plan was acted upon, Yao Hsiang came out to fight, was lured as far as San­ yuan by the enemy's pretended flight, and finally attacked and slain.] (4) a delicacy of honor which issensitive to shame; [This need not be taken to mean that a sense of hon­ or is really a defect in a general. What Sun Tzu condemns is rather an exaggerated sensi­ tiveness to slanderous reports,...
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