Shagya arabian

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Shagya Arabian
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Shagya Arabian |

Shagya Arabian |
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Country of origin: | Hungary,southeastern Europe | |
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Horse (Equus ferus caballus) | |
The Shagya Arabian was developed in the Austro-Hungarian Empire during the 19th century at the Bábolna, Mezőhegyes, Radautz, Piber, andTopolciankystuds. Today it is most often seen in the Czech Republic, Austria, Romania, the former Yugoslavian countries, Poland, Germany, and Hungary, but has been exported to other nations and is bredaround the world. A purebred Shagya Arabian today has bloodlines can be traced in all lines to the stud books of Radautz, Babolna, and Topolcianky. The breed is considered by some to be a subspeciesof Arabian horse, but due to the presence of a small amount of non-Arabian breeding is considered an Anglo-Arabian or a partbred Arabian in some places.
Contents [hide] * 1 Origin * 2 Bloodlines *3 Traits * 4 Uses * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links |
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[edit]Origin

Statue of Shagya at Babolna
One of the majorfounding sires was Shagya, a gray Arabian[1] (or, some say part-Arabian) stallion with some ancestors of the Kehilan and Siglavy strains. Born in Syria in 1810, he was taller than the average Arabian of the time,standing 15.2-1/2 hands high (62 1/2 inches at the withers). He was mostly used for crossbreeding at Babolna, bred few asil Arabian mares, and thus has no pure Arabian descendants today.[2] Many ofthe Arabian stallions standing at Babolna and other studs were crossbred with mares who already possessed a great deal of Arabian influence due to the long Turkish occupation of Eastern Europe.Some Thoroughbreds and Lipizzans were also used. In all cases, meticulous pedigree records were kept.[1]
Originally, these predominantly, but not Asil ("pure") Arabian horses were referred to by...
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