Conditionals

Solo disponible en BuenasTareas
  • Páginas : 11 (2536 palabras )
  • Descarga(s) : 0
  • Publicado : 5 de marzo de 2012
Leer documento completo
Vista previa del texto
CONDITIONALS
ZERO CONDITIONAL
If + present tense, + present tense
Present tense (no comma) + if + present tense

Use zero conditional sentences to talk about general truths and scientific facts.

If clause result clause
* If it’s noon in Lima, It’s 6:00 P.M. in Rome.

The if clause talks about the condition, and the result clause talks about what happens if the conditionsoccurs. Use the simple present tense in both clauses.

If clause result clause
* If air expands, it becomes lighter.

You can also use present factual conditional sentences to talk about habits and recurring events (things that happen again and again).

If clause result clause
* If Bill flies, he orders a special meal.

Use the simple present tense or presentprogressive in the if clause. Use the simple present tense in the result clause.

If clause result clause.
* If I’m traveling far, I always fly.

You can also use modals in the result clause.

* If you practice your Chinese every day, you can improve quickly.
* You might learn more if you listen to Chinese tapes.

Use the imperative in the result clause to give instructions,commands, and invitations that depend on a certain condition.

* If you want the seat to recline, press the button.
* If the seat belt light is on, don’t leave your seat.
* If you come to Tokyo, stay with us.

You can begin conditional sentences with the if clause or the result clause. The meaning is the same. Use a comma between the two clauses only when the if clause comesfirst.

* If the light goes on, buckle your seat belt.
Or
* Buckle your seat belt if the light goes on.

STATEMENTS | | STATEMENTS |
IF CLAUSE | RESULT CLAUSE | | RESULT CLAUSE | IF CLAUSE |
If | it snows, | the airport closes. | | The airport closes | if | it snows. |
| it's foggy, | planes can't leave. | | Planes can't leave. | | it's foggy. |

YES / NO QUESTIONS | |SHORT ANSWERS |
RESULT CLAUSE | IF CLAUSE | | AFFIRMATIVE | NEGATIVE |
Does the airport close | if | it snows? | | Yes, | It does. | No, | it doesn't. |
Can planes leave | | it's foggy? | | | they can | | they cant'. |

WH- QUESTIONS |
RESULT CLAUSE | IF CLAUSE |
Why does air get lighter | ifit expands? |

FIRST CONDICIONAL
If + present tense, + future tense
Future tense (nocomma) + if + present tense
Imperative condition + and + future tense

Use the first conditional sentences to talk about what will happen under certain conditions. The if clause states the condition. The result clause states the result.

If clause result clause.
* If Baker wins, he’ll raise taxes.
(It’s a real possibility that Baker will win.)

Use the simple present tense in theif clause. Use the future with will or be going to in the result clause.

* If Soto wins, she’ll improve housing.
* If Soto wins, she’s going to improve housing.

You can also use a modal in the result clause.

* If you want to vote, you must register.
* If you don’t vote, you might regret it.

BE CAREFUL! Even though the if clause refers to the future, use the simplepresent tense.

* If she wins, she’ll fight crime.
NOT If she will win…

You can begin conditional sentences with the if clause or the result clause. The meaning is the same. Use a comma between the two clauses only when the if clause comes first.

* If you vote for Soto, you won’t regret it.
OR
* You won’t regret it if you vote for Soto.

If and unless can both be used inconditional sentences, but their meaning are very different.

* If you vote, you’ll have a say in the future of our city.

Use unless to state a negative condition. Unless often has the same meaning as if…not.

* Unless you vote, you won’t have a say in the future of our city.
OR
* Id you don’t vote, you won’t have a say in the future of our city.

AFFIRMATIVE STATEMENTS...
tracking img