Aviation technician

Solo disponible en BuenasTareas
  • Páginas : 34 (8481 palabras )
  • Descarga(s) : 0
  • Publicado : 27 de marzo de 2011
Leer documento completo
Vista previa del texto
Aviation Fuels Technical Review

Table of Contents

General Introduction ..................................................... i 1 • Aviation Turbine Fuel Introduction ........................... 1 Types of Fuel Fuel Consumption 2 • Aviation Turbine Fuel Performance........................... 3 Performance Properties Cleanliness Safety Properties Emissions 3 • Aviation Turbine FuelSpecifications and Test Method .............................. 14 Specifications Test Methods 4 • Aviation Turbine Fuel Composition..........................24 Base Fuel Property/Composition Relationships Chemistry of Jet Fuel Instability Water in Jet Fuel Additives 5 • Aviation Turbine Fuel Refining ................................33 Raw Material Refining Processes The Modern Refinery 6 • Aviation TurbineEngines........................................38 Principle of Operation Engine Types Combustion in the Engine 7 • Aviation Gasoline Introduction .............................. 43 Grades of Fuel Fuel Consumption

8 • Aviation Gasoline Performance.............................. 45 Performance Properties Cleanliness Safety Properties 9 • Aviation Gasoline Specifications and Test Methods............................ 54 Specifications Future Fuels Test Methods 10 • Aviation Gasoline Composition ............................. 63 Composition Property/Composition Relationships Additives 11 • Aviation Gasoline Refining ................................... 66 Alkylation Avgas Blending 12 • Aircraft Piston Engines ......................................... 68 Internal Combustion Engines EngineDevelopment A • Aviation Fuel Distribution and Handling ..................74 Fuel Distribution System Receiving Fuel at Airports Contamination and Cleanup Quality Control B • About Hydrocarbons ..............................................85 Hydrocarbon Chemistry Sources of More Information....................................... 89 Abbreviations............................................................ 90

Please note: This information is accurate as of fall 2004. It may be superseded by new regulations, specifications, or advances in fuel or engine technologies. Written, edited, and designed by employees and contractors of Chevron: Greg Hemighaus, Tracy Boval, John Bacha, Fred Barnes, Matt Franklin, Lew Gibbs, Nancy Hogue, Jacqueline Jones, David Lesnini, John Lind and Jack Morris. Theauthors would like to express their sincere thanks to Steve Casper (United Airlines), Cesar Gonzalez (consultant), Oren Hadaller (Boeing), Rick Moffett (Textron Lycoming), Roger Organ (Caltex), Jerry Scott (UVair), Stan Seto (GE Aircraft Engines), Rick Waite (Velcon Filters), and Ron Wilkinson (Electrosystems) for reviewing a draft version of this publication and making many helpful suggestions. Anyremaining errors or omissions are the sole responsibility of the authors. Aviation Fuels Technical Review (FTR-3)
© 2006 Chevron Corporation. All rights reserved. Cover image provided courtesy of, and copyright by, Boeing. All rights reserved.

General Introduction

Man has long been captivated by the possibility of flight. From Icarus’ wings to DaVinci’s flying machines to lighter-than-airballoons, inventive minds worked to turn the dream into a reality. But what was lacking was a means of propulsion. This finally became available in the early years of the 20th century with the development of the internal combustion engine. This engine provided a compact and portable source of power that allowed man to overcome the pull of gravity. The early aircraft engines were similar to those usedin automobiles and burned the same fuel. The need for increased power led to the development of specialized engines and aviation gasolines (avgas) tailored to their requirements. In the 1940s, the turbine engine emerged as the answer to the quest for still more power. In a replay of avgas development, kerosine – the fuel used in the first aircraft turbine engines – was eventually replaced by...
tracking img