Romanian and bulgarian cinematography during the period of the cold war

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Romanian and Bulgarian cinematography during the period of Cold War

During the period of Cold War (1945-1991) cinematography in general was developing slowly, mostly because of the existence ofentertainment industry blacklist (“Hollywood Blacklist“) and restrictions of the Communist Party. The “Hollywood Blacklist” was a list of screenwriters, actors, directors, musicians, and other UnitedStates’ entertainment professionals who weren’t allowed to be employed in cinematography or any other entertainment positions because of their political beliefs or associations, no matter if they werereal or suspected. Even though the list was active in the U.S., it also affected Romania and Bulgaria (and other European countries). Although the Cold War slowed down the development ofcinematography, many works used it as a backdrop or they directly took part in fictional conflict between the United States and Union of Soviet Socialist Republics [films such as “Invasion U.S.A.” (1952) and “RedNightmare” (1962)].
In Romania during the Cold War, Sergiu Nicolaescu was (and still is) one of the most popular film directors. He is best known for his historical movies, such as MihaiViteazul (1970, translated as Michael the Brave and The Last Crusade), Dacii (1966, Les Guerriers), Razboiul Independenţei (1977, War of Independence). During the Communist period, some of his movies were seen asground-breaking through their way of publicly presenting Romanian history. For example, the movie "Războiul Independenţei" was the first Communist-era Romanian film that presented a Romanian king froma positive point of view. Sergiu Nicolaescu later expanded on historical themes, directing films that showed Ion Antonescu, Romania's dictator in the period of World War II, in a positive light (suchas Începutul adevărului, also known as Oglinda).
Another very famous Romanian film director (and screenwriter) is Jean Negulesco. Due to the fact that in 1927 he moved to New York, most of his...
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