Scotland

Solo disponible en BuenasTareas
  • Páginas : 10 (2259 palabras )
  • Descarga(s) : 0
  • Publicado : 28 de febrero de 2012
Leer documento completo
Vista previa del texto
TYPICAL FOOD AND DRINK
TYPICAL FOOD AND DRINK






It is amazing that so many renowned and authenticScottish food recipes come from a country as small as Scotland; recipes that are used every single day in homes and restaurants throughout the enchanting Kingdom of Fife. The fertile soil and climate give us enormous variety of natural foods that have put us at the forefront of the international food industry, and become famous for creating some of the finest authentic Scottish food recipes anddelicacies, which are sought after around the world. Many, of course, are associated with special occasions like a traditional Scottish Christmas, St Andrews Day, the famousHogmanay (or New Year's Eve)and of course Burns Suppers where the authentic Scottish Food recipes such as haggis, champit tatties and bashed neeps are served. Check out Valentine's Day Meal for recipes for Smoked Salmon Moussefollowedby Steak in Whisky & Pepper Sauce, finishing with a delicious Chocolate Cream; or have a look at Easter Sunday Menu for recipes for Cream of Carrot & Coriander Soup, followed by Roast Lamb, with profiteroles (not a true Scottish dish) for dessert.

Whisky, or uisge beatha, water of life in gaelic, is the national drink of Scotland. Whisky has been produced in Scotland since the fifteenthcentury. For a long period of time, the distilling of whisky was illegal, a law achieving nothing but driving stills underground where illicit distilling went on. In 1823, the production and selling of whisky was legalized and today the drink is Scotland´s chief export. Many of today´s huge distilleries are built on the same spot as the original illegal stills, using the same source of water asbefore. The quality of the water is considered the crucial element in the making of a good whisky. Many distilleries are therefore situated in the Highlands, taking advantage of the clear mountain springs. 

Two types of whisky are produced in scottish distilleries; single malt is made only with water, barley and yeast, whereas grain whisky, relatively cheap in production, mainly is made withmaize and a small amount of barley. Blended whisky, which accounts for more than 90% of the total sales, is as the name suggests, a blend of the two types. A blended whisky is made up of around 70% grain whisky and 30% malt whisky. The higher proportion of malts, the more expensive the blend. Brands as Johnny Walker, Bells and The Famous Grouse are all blended whiskies. Many distilleries produce maltwhisky both for blending with others and for their own single malt brand. Grain whisky on the other hand is produced only for blending. Whisky is today Scotland´s chief export and one of the biggest tourist attractions. All over the country you can visit distilleries for a guided tour, a complimentary free dram, and - naturally - a visit to the souvenir- and whiskyshop. The prices are however notany cheaper than other outlets. Visitor distilleries come in all sizes - multimedia, seven-language masstours or small, simple and low-profile tours.

Of course being surrounded by sea the whole of Britain is famous for itsTraditional Fish and Chips in Batter, often served with 'mushy peas', with many 'Chippies' as we call them claiming to have their own secret recipe. One famous Award-winning'Chippie' is in the town of Anstruther in the East Neuk of Fife.



TYPICAL DRESSES
TYPICAL DRESSES

Scotland clothing mainly features the tartan which is the traditional dress of Scotland. People of the Highland Scots mostly wear this dress. Kilt was the one of the traditional Scotland dress of the...
tracking img