Flute extended techniques

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NEW SOUNDS FOR FLUTE
- on flute techniques from the 20th century
○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

A. Changes of pitch
1. Glissandi 2. Micro intervals

B. Changes of timbre
1. Harmonics 2. Alternative fingerings 3. Tone-colour trills 4. With voice 5. Changes in the “tone developer”

C. Polyphony
1. Multiphonics 2. With voice

D.Attack and influence on the air stream
1. Key percussion 2. Slap tongue 3. Tongue ram 4. Flatterzunge

E. New technique of tone development
1. Whistle tones 2. Trumpet sound 3. Strong air stream without tone

F. Appendix: Fingering tablature for quarter-tones, for flutes without ring keys

Version 3.1e, October 2005 Downloaded from www.sforzando.se/flutetech ©Mats Möller/Sforzando production1987/2003. May be distributed and used by flautists and composers, but not offered for sale or used without mentioning the source. 1

A. Changes of pitch
1. Glissandi (it. sliding) represent a. filling up an interval by playing a scale b. a continuous slide from a pitch to another Is played a: 1. by filling up the interval mainly with semi-tones, or bigger intervals, depending on tempo andthe distance between the first and last notes of the glissando 2. possibly by filling up the interval with quarter-tones

A N

gliss.

[N

b: 1. with embouchure, in combination with turning the flute inwards or outwards 2. on flutes with ring keys; by gradually opening or closing the rings 3. on flutes with pads in bad condition; by closing or opening the keys slowly 4. by bending thespindle on which the keys are mounted, as to make the keys not cover perfectly

gliss. A N [N

2. Micro-intervals

Intervals less than a semi-tone, i.e. less than 100 cents. a. quarter-tones (50 cents), played 1. on flutes without ring keys, primarily with new fingerings, on flutes with ring keys with new fingerings or by using holes only partially open (the new fingerings will also changetone-colour) 2. by changing the embouchure and turning the flute in- or outwards (not very precise, but does not change the tone-colour as much as 1.) Written:

¿ ¡ ¬ √ ƒ ≈
2

1/4 note up 1/4 note down

3/4 notes up (sharpened semi-tone+sharpened quarter-tone) sharpened one semi-tone+flattened one quarter-tone flattened one semi-tone+sharpened one quarter-tone 3/4 tones down (flattened onesemi-tone+flattened one quartertone)

A scale with quarter-tones downwards - and upwards - may be written like this:

12 N ¡ N Y N ≈ N N ¡ N N ¡ N Y N ≈ N M A4

A N ¿ N [N ¬N N ¿ N N ¿ N [N ¬N M
b. 1/5-tones, 1/8-tones etc. Played with new fingerings and/or changing of embouchure. The notation often differs from one piece to another. c. micro-tone trills Played with fingerings which are mostlyprinted in the piece. Compare with tonecolour trills which may also be micro-tone trills.

B. Changes of timbre
1. Harmonics Harmonics from c1:

A

Å Å Å N ≈N Å Å N N Å N N L

Notated as it sounds, or together with the fundamental note from which the harmonic is produced:

Å N

Å N

A

A û

It is possible to play the same harmonic from different fundamental notes:

A
2.Alternative fingerings

Å Å Å N N N û û û

Alternative fingerings will change tone-colour. You may also use a micro-tone fingering, and then play at correct pitch, so as to create a new tone-colour. Named “bisbigliando” or “Hollow tone”. o Most often written with fingering: but occasionally: 2o o o5 o o 7

.

M



A

A
3

3. Tone-colour trills

Rapid change between the normalfingering and a fingering changing the tone-colour. These trills most often also change the pitch. Written with fingering:

.. .•
ox –o –o o 7

A M
4. With voice By singing the same tone as played, the tone-colour will change. The effect is most obvious when you sing in the same octave as you play. May be written:

N N N N N A Ä Ä Ä Ä Ä
or: Sing _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _|

N A N N N N
5. Changes...
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