Industrial archeology

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Ideology, Function and Industrial Space:
An analysis of the spatial organization of late
nineteenth and early twentieth century jam
factories
Megan Tutty, B.App.Sc.
October 2001
A thesis submitted in fulfillment of the requirements for
the degree of Bachelor of Archaeology (Honours)
Department of Archaeology
Faculty of Education, Humanities, Law and Theology
Flinders University of SouthAustralia
Abstract
This thesis is concerned with the organization of space at industrial sites as
represented by jam factories that operated in the Adelaide region during the late
nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It suggests that although archaeologists
have typically examined industrial sites from a functional perspective, the spatial
organization of such sites results from anumber of factors, and perhaps reflects
more than site function alone. In doing so, it addresses the notion that capitalist
ideology influenced the layout of industrial sites.
The research draws on evidence acquired through the excavation of the Fullarton
Jam Factory in South Australia, and on historical data concerning a number of
other jam manufacturing enterprises including Glen Ewin atHoughton, Murray's
Biscuit and Jam Factory at Coromandel Valley, and Henry Jones IXL Ltd factory in
Hobart. It examines existing theory regarding the organization of space at both
industrial sites and North American plantation sites, and uses this literature as the
basis for the development of the argument.
Accordingly, this work provides a model of site function at jam manufacturing
sites. Themodel summarizes each of the stages of the manufacturing process
and identifies spatial correlates. This work further engages in a critical analysis of
the ideological influences apparent in jam factory design, and offers several
examples. It concludes that the spatial organization of the sites investigated
reflects something more than the functional requirement of the manufacturing
process,and recommends that the future investigation of industrial sites will
benefit from more sophisticated analyses that consider both ideological and
functional influences.
ii
Acknowledgements
The completion of this thesis would not have been possible without the support
and assistance of a number of people. My thanks are due to the following:
Mark Staniforth, for his supervision and guidance,Matt Schlitz, for his considerable assistance with field survey,
Rob Pilgrim, for his comments and advice,
Other staff and students of the Department of Archaeology at Flinders
University, including Tim Owen and Jody Steele, who made the excavation
of the Fullarton Jam Factory possible,
Bill Wauchope of Glen Ewin, for allowing me access to his property and
historical files,
Bill and HelenCramond of Surrey Orchards, for allowing me access to their
property and sharing their knowledge of its history,
Jonathon and Laura Law, who now occupy what remains of Murray's Biscuit
and Jam Factory, for allowing me access to their property and collection of
historical photographs,
and, of course, those family and friends who provided me with unlimited
encouragement and support, particularlymy mother Anne, and my partner Dave.
iii
Contents
Abstract
Acknowledgements
Contents iv
List of Figures, Plates and Tables vi
Abbreviations and Definitions ix
Table of Conversions
xii
1. Introduction 1
1.1 1
1.2 4
1.3 8
1.4 13
Statement and Definition of the Thesis
Rationale and Research Significance
Historical Background
Research Objectives
2. Theoretical Issues
2.1
2.2
2.32.4
The
The
The
The
Factory
Factory
Factory
Factory
14
in History
in Space
and Function
and Ideology
14
19
23
27
3. Research Design and Methodology
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
Archaeological Excavation - Fullarton Jam Factory
Site Survey - Fullarton Jam Factory
Documentary Research
Site Visits
Data Organization and Management
Limitations of the Study
4. Results
33...
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