Total physical response

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UNIVERSIDAD AUTONOMA DE CHIAPAS

ESCUELA DE LENGUAS, TAPACHULA CAMPUS IV

LICENCIATURA EN LA ENSEÑANZA DEL INGLÈS

INTRODUCCIÒN A LA DIDACTICA

MISS SALLY BARMEJO

TOTAL PHYSICAL RESPONSE

EQUIPO 3:
CORTES CONTRERAS ULISES
ESCOBAR DE LEON DARISELI
GONZALEZ MALO CINDY
HILERIO RODAS FATIMA
MEJIA SANCHEZ FRANCISCA
PARADA GONZALEZ FANNY
VILLALOBOS VILLARREAL DANIELA

TAPACHULA,CHIAPAS A 25 DE OCTUBRE DE 2010
TOTAL PHYSICAL RESPONSE
DEFINITON:

TPR is based on the premise that the human brain has a biological program for acquiring any natural language on earth - including the sign language of the deaf. The process is visible when we observe how infants internalize their first language. The secret is a unique "conversation" between the parent and infant. Forexample, the first conversation is a parent saying, "Look at daddy. Look at daddy." The infant's face turns in the direction of the voice and daddy exclaims, "She's looking at me! She's looking at me!" Dr. Asher calls this "a language-body conversation" because the parent speaks and the infant answers with a physical response such as looking, smiling, laughing, turning, walking, reaching, grasping,holding, sitting, running, and so forth.

MAIN PRINCIPLES OF THE METHOD
According to Asher, TPR is based on the premise that the human brain has a biological program for acquiring any natural language on earth - including the sign language of the deaf.
The process is visible when we observe how infants internalize their first language. It looks to the way that children learn their nativelanguage. Communication between parents and their children combines both verbal and physical aspects:
← The child responds physically to the speech of their parent.
← The responses of the child are in turn positively reinforced by the speech of the parent.
← For many months the child absorbs the language without being able to speak. It is during this period that the internalizationand code breaking occurs.
← After this stage the child is able to reproduce the language spontaneously.
← With TPR the language teacher tries to mimic this process in class.

According to its proponents, it has a number of advantages:

← Students will enjoy getting up out of their chairs and moving around.
← Simple TPR activities do not require a great deal of preparation onthe part of the teacher.
← TPR is aptitude-free, working well with a mixed ability class, and with students having various disabilities.
← It is good for kinesthetic learners who need to be active in the class.
← Class size need not be a problem, and it works effectively for children and adults.
← However, it is recognized that TPR is most useful for beginners, though it can beused at higher levels where preparation becomes an issue for the teacher.
← It does not give students the opportunity to express their own thoughts in a creative way. Further, it is easy to overuse TPR– "Any novelty, if carried on too long, will trigger adaptation.“
← It can be a challenge for shy students.
← Additionally, the nature of TPR places an unnaturally heavy emphasis onthe use of the imperative mood, that is to say commands such as "sit down" and "stand up". These features are of limited utility to the learner, and can lead to a learner appearing rude when attempting to use his new language.
← Of course, as a TPR class progresses, group activities and descriptions can be used which continue the basic concepts of TPR into full communication situations.← The method also promises double efficiency in terms of rate of learning, according to several studies in the literature.

ORIGINGS OF THE METHOD

TPR (Total Physical Response) was developed by Dr. James J. Asher in the 1960s. It is a teaching technique teachers use to instruct students, especially young learners, who are in the process of learning a second or foreign language. The...
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