Molecular gastronomy

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Chem. Rev. 2010, 110, 2313–2365

2313

Molecular Gastronomy: A New Emerging Scientific Discipline
Peter Barham,†,‡ Leif H. Skibsted,‡ Wender L. P. Bredie,‡ Michael Bom Frøst,‡ Per Møller,‡ Jens Risbo,‡ Pia Snitkjær,‡ and Louise Mørch Mortensen‡
Department of Physics, University of Bristol, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol, United Kingdom BS8 1TL and Department ofZoology, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, 7701 Cape Town, South Africa and Department of Food Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958, Frederiksberg, Denmark Received March 18, 2009

Contents
1. Introduction 2313 2. Senses 2316 2.1. Sense of Taste 2317 2.2. Sense of Smell 2317 2.2.1. Perception of Aroma 2318 2.3. Chemesthesis 2318 2.4. Texture (Sense of Touch) 2318 2.5.Temperature 2319 2.6. Concept of Flavor 2319 2.7. Multimodal Integration 2319 2.8. Adaptation and Suppression 2320 2.8.1. Adaptation 2320 2.8.2. Mixture Suppression 2320 3. How Different Food Production Techniques May 2320 Affect Flavor and Texture 3.1. Organic vs Conventional Farming 2321 3.2. Effect of Feed on the Flavor of Meat 2321 3.3. Effect of Feed on the Flavor and Texture of 2321 DairyProducts 3.4. Flavor Variation in Fruits and Vegetables 2322 4. Food Processing (Cookery) 2322 4.1. Flavor Development 2323 4.1.1. Microbial Reactions 2323 4.1.2. Chemical Reactions Affecting Flavor 2325 4.1.3. Illustrative Example: Preparing Meat Stocks 2332 4.2. Color of Food 2334 4.2.1. Color of Meats 2334 4.2.2. Color of Fruit and Vegetables 2336 4.3. Textures in Food and How To Make Them 2337 4.3.1.Relationships between Perceived Texture 2338 and Measurable Physical Properties 4.3.2. Complex Nontissue Foods: Foams and 2338 Emulsions 4.3.3. Crystalline State in Foods 2343 4.3.4. Glassy State in Foods 2344 4.3.5. Gels and Gelation 2345 4.3.6. Cooking of Meat 2348 4.4. Cooking Methods and How They Work 2350 4.4.1. Traditional Cooking Methods 2351 4.4.2. “New” Cooking Techniques 2353
* To whomcorrespondence should be addressed. Peter.Barham@bristol.ac.uk. † University of Bristol and University of Cape Town. ‡ University of Copenhagen. E-mail:

5. Enjoyment and Pleasure of Eating: Sensory Perception of Flavor, Texture, Deliciousness, Etc 5.1. Flavor Release 5.2. Matrix Interactions and Thermodynamic Aspects 5.3. Transport of Volatiles and Kinetic Phenomena 5.4. In Vivo FlavorGeneration 5.5. Sensory Perception of Flavor: Complexity and Deliciousness 6. Summary and the Future 6.1. Complexity and Satiety: Relationships between Liking, Quality, and Intake 6.2. Models for Cooks and Chefs 6.3. Language of Sensory Properties: Engaging the Public 6.4. Science Education Using Food as Exemplars 6.5. What Is Molecular Gastronomy? Where Will It End Up? 7. Acknowledgments 8. References2355 2355 2355 2356 2356 2356 2358 2359 2360 2360 2361 2361 2361 2362

1. Introduction
The science of domestic and restaurant cooking has recently moved from the playground of a few interested amateurs into the realm of serious scientific endeavor. A number of restaurants around the world have started to adopt a more scientific approach in their kitchens,1–3 and perhaps partly as a result,several of these have become acclaimed as being among the best in the world.4,5 Today, many food writers and chefs, as well as most gourmets, agree that chemistry lies at the heart of the very finest food available in some of the world’s finest restaurants. At least in the world of gourmet food, chemistry has managed to replace its often tarnished image with a growing respect as the application of basicchemistry in the kitchen has provided the starting point for a whole new cuisine. The application of chemistry and other sciences to restaurant and domestic cooking is thus making a positive impact in a very public arena which inevitably gives credence to the subject as a whole. As yet, however, this activity has been largely in the form of small collaborations between scientists and chefs. To...
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