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David Hume (7 May 1711 – 25 August 1776)
was a Scottish philosopher, economist, historian and a key figure in the history of Western philosophy and the Scottish Enlightenment. Hume is oftengrouped with John Locke, George Berkeley, and a handful of others as a British Empiricist.
During Hume's lifetime, he was more famous as a historian; his six-volume History of England was a bestseller wellinto the nineteenth century and the standard work on English history for many years, while his works in philosophy to which he owes his current reputation were mostly unknown during his day.
Humewas heavily influenced by empiricists John Locke and George Berkeley, along with various French-speaking writers such as Pierre Bayle, and various figures on the English-speaking intellectual landscapesuch as Isaac Newton, Samuel Clarke, Francis Hutcheson (his teacher), and Joseph Butler (to whom he sent his first work for feedback).
In the twentieth century, Hume has increasingly become a sourceof inspiration for those in political philosophy and economics as an early and subtle thinker in the liberal tradition, as well as an early innovator in the genre of the essay in his Essays Moral,Political, and Literary
David Hume, originally David Home, son of Joseph Home of Chirnside, advocate, and Katherine Lady Falconer, was born on 26 April 1711 (Old Style) in a tenement on the northside of the Lawnmarket in Edinburgh. He changed his name in 1734 because the English had difficulty pronouncing 'Home' in the Scottish manner. Throughout his life Hume, who never married, spent timeoccasionally at his family home at Ninewells by Chirnside, Berwickshire. Hume was politically a Whig
Contributions to economic thought
Through his discussions on politics, Hume developed many ideasthat are prevalent in the field of economics. This includes ideas on private property, inflation, and foreign trade.
Hume does not believe, as Locke does, that private property is a natural right,...
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