The lord of the rings

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In the lord of the rings, Tolkien talks about the One Ring, referring to the power and the evil in the world, in the story many of the characters were tempted in many different circumstances and many kinds of people, from the most brave to the most weak, the story is about the journey that one hobbit with his friends have to go to destroy the ring where it was first made, and in that long journeythe ring tempts to most of the characters, such as Frodo, Sam, Gollum, Gandalf, Lady Galadriel and Faramir.
Frodo is by no mean the perfect hero he never finds true peace, but is permitted, as a ring bearer and one who has dwelt in the two worlds, to pass over the straight road to Valinor. This outcome, together with a hint of the starglass given him by Galadriel, is referred to by Gandalf;“he is still not half through yet, and to what he will com in the end not
even Elrond can foretell. Not to evil, I think. He may become like a glass
filled with a clear light for eyes to see that can.” (Tolkien 276)
Frodo Starts holding the Ring to keep it and guard it, which, as I have observed, is a porpuse that will result in the ring being slow to harm him. However, although he iswarned by Gandalf not to use the ring both at Hobbiton and in the letter left at The Prancing Pony Inn, he uses it on three occasions nonetheless. When he slips on the ring at

the house of Tom Bombadil it is to see that indeed he still has the real ring, for when Bombadil put the ring on he did not vanish, and it had no power over him. Frodo clearly was both annoyed and concerned at somepossible sleight of hand.
“Fordo looked at it closely and rather suspiciously. It was the same ring,
or looked the same and weighed the same; for the ring had always seemed
to Frodo to weigh strangely heavy in the hand. But something prompted
him to make sure. He was perhaps a trifle annoyed with Tom for seeming
to make so light of what Gandalf thought so perilouslyimportant.” (Tolkien 258)

Frodo next uses the ring an the Inn when he is performing the encore of his son. The ring seemed to betray him, and slipped onto his finger as he fell off the table. This is a clearly demonstration of the motivation of the ring, for it does constitute a considered choice from Frodo’s part.
There is a temptation to slip on the ring when the hobbits areprisoners of the Barrow-Wight:
“Then a wild thought of escape came to him. He wondered if he put on
the ring, whether the Barrow-Wight would miss him, and he might find
some way out. He thought of himself running free over the grass, grieving
for Merry, and Sam, and Pippin, but free and alive himself. Gandalf would
admit that there had been nothing else to do.”(Tolkien 359)

The most dangerous use of the ring comes at Weathertop, when, in the presence of the Black Riders, he slips on the ring. Part of the desire to do so comes from the ring itself, trying to return to its master and sensing the presence of his most powerful servants. But principally the reason is to hide and escape. He refrains from yielding to temptation on the first occasionbecause the Black Rider suddenly sits up, shakes the reins of his horse and moves away. “… he longed to yield. Not with the hope of escape, or of doing anything, either good or bad: he simply felt that he must take the ring and put it on his finger.” (Tolkien 652). Frodo does use the ring, and yet manages to escape is only made possible by his call upon Elbereth and the intervention of Aragon wieldingfire. It is clear from Aragon’s comment that Frodo did not would the pale king with the Barrow-dagger.
During the attempt t cross the misty mountains by the mountain pass and the journey through the Mines of Moria, Frodo is not tempted to use the ring. The ring comes into sharp focus at the Mirror of Galadriel. This incident represents a double temptation. It is a temptation for...
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