Lubicz - the temple in man - sacred architecture and the perfect man

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The Temple in Man
Sacred Architecture and the Perfect Man

R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz
Translated by Robert & Deborah Lawlor

Illustrated by Lucie Lamy

Table of Contents

PAGE Translator's Foreword ................................................... 7 Preface .......................................................................... 14 Introduction.................................................................. 16 Definitions ....................................................................... 27

CHAPTER I. A Hypothesis and Its Evolution..................... 33 CHAPTER II. Significance of the Crown of the Skull........................... 48 CHAPTER III. Reflections on a Philosophy of Measure ..................... 57 CHAPTER IV. The Plan.............................................. 68 CHAPTER V. Orientation ............................................ 80 CHAPTER VI. The Temple in Man ............................. 86 CHAPTER VII. The Crossing: Egyptian Mentality .. 111 CHAPTER VIII. The Egyptian Canon for a Standing Man ............................. 115

Conclusions ......................................................................

132

Translator'sForeword

THE APPEARANCE of this small book in 1949 created an unusually large academic controversy in the renowned Department of Egyptology of the College de France, Paris. An "amateur" Egyptologist (as the scholars must have labeled Schwaller de Lubicz) had presented an entirely new and radical approach for the consideration of Egyptologists, archaeologists, and historians in general, anapproach that might have been ignored completely had it not been developed with such a great amount of forceful, detailed research, and had it not won over the complete acceptance and enthusiasm of several of the leading Egyptologists and archaeologists of that time, including Alexandre Varille and C.H. Robichon. We shall not go into the intriguing way in which the academic establishment circumvented aconfrontation with the challenge posed by Le Temple dans l'Homme; nor shall we examine how they attempted to dismiss this work through the well-known academic tactic of intentional silence. Instead, let us use these few pages to introduce this relatively little known author, then to see what might be some of the major themes contained in the "New Egyptology" that Schwaller de Lubicz's work opensbefore us. It is true that Schwaller de Lubicz was not a qualified Egyptologist by academic standards. Instead of first spending years in the Egyptological libraries of Europe, he, upon his first visit to Egypt, took up residence together with his family1 in a small hotel
1

His wife, Isha Schwaller de Lubicz, a specialist in Egyptian hieroglyphic language, later wrote a two-volume noveldepicting life in ancient Egypt through the eyes of a young man who attains the level of temple initiation. In Her-Bak Chirk Pea (Inner Traditions. 1979) and Her-Bak: The Living Face of Ancient Egypt (Inner Traditions. 1978) she utilizes philosophic inspiration and research material from her husband's work. His stepdaughter Lucie Lamy carried out the exacting survey of the entire temple.

7

verynear the Temple of Luxor, and there he remained For more than fifteen years of intense, uninterrupted study of this great monument of the Eighteenth Dynasty of pharaonic Egypt. Schwaller de Lubicz was already a mature man by the time he arrived in Egypt. Let us therefore review briefly his earlier years.2 At about eighteen years of age. Rene Schwaller left his home in Alsace, after having completedan apprenticeship with his father in pharmaceutical chemistry, and went to Paris with the clearly formulated intention of "learning the true nature of substance." In addition to studying modern chemistry and physics, at this young age he began reading every alchemical text he could find, those of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries as well as sixteenth-century Rosicrucian texts and the more...
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