Essay heladeria cream

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  • Publicado : 23 de noviembre de 2011
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n the Persian Empire, people would pour grape-juice concentrate over snow, in a bowl, and eat this as a treat, especially when the weather was hot. Snow would either be saved in the cool-keepingunderground chambers known as "yakhchal", or taken from snowfall that remained at the top of mountains by the summer capital - Hagmatana, Ecbatana or Hamedan of today. In 400 BC, the Persians went furtherand invented a special chilled food, made of rose water and vermicelli, which was served to royalty during summers.[2] The ice was mixed with saffron, fruits, and various other flavours.

Ancientcivilizations have served ice for cold foods for thousands of years. The BBC reports that a frozen mixture of milk and rice was used in China around 200 BC.[3] The Roman Emperor Nero (37–68) had icebrought from the mountains and combined it with fruit toppings. These were some early chilled delicacies.[4]

Arabs were perhaps the first to use milk as a major ingredient in the production of icecream. They sweetened it with sugar rather than fruit juices, and perfected means of commercial production. As early as the 10th century, ice cream was widespread among many of the Arab world's majorcities, such as Baghdad, Damascus, and Cairo. It was produced from milk or cream, often with some yoghurt, and was flavoured with rosewater, dried fruits and nuts. It is believed that the recipe wasbased on older Ancient Arabian, Mesopotamian, Greek, or Roman recipes, which were, it is presumed, the first and precursors to Persian faloodeh.

Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat asserts, in her History ofFood, that "the Chinese may be credited with inventing a device to make sorbets and ice cream. They poured a mixture of snow and saltpetre over the exteriors of containers filled with syrup, for, inthe same way as salt raises the boiling-point of water, it lowers the freezing-point to below zero."[5][6] (Toussaint does not provide historical documentation for this.) Some distorted accounts claim...
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