Huckleberry fin

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THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN
BY

MARK TWAIN

A

G L A S S B O O K

C L A S S I C

HUCKLEBERRY FINN

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
(Tom Sawyer’s Comrade)

by

Mark Twain
A G L A S S B O O K C L A S S I C

NOTICE
PERSONS attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting tofind a plot in it will be shot.

BY ORDER OF THE AUTHOR, Per G.G., Chief of Ordnance.

EXPLANATORY
IN this book a number of dialects are used, to wit: the Missouri negro dialect; the extremest form of the backwoods Southwestern dialect; the ordinary “Pike County” dialect; and four modified varieties of this last. The shadings have not been done in a haphazard fashion, or by guesswork; butpainstakingly, and with the trustworthy guidance and support of personal familiarity with these several forms of speech. I make this explanation for the reason that without it many readers would suppose that all these characters were trying to talk alike and not succeeding.

THE AUTHOR

CONTENTS

C HAPTER O NE C HAPTER T WO C HAPTER T HREE C HAPTER F OUR C HAPTER F IVE C HAPTER S IX C HAPTER SEVEN C HAPTER E IGHT C HAPTER N INE C HAPTER T EN C HAPTER E LEVEN C HAPTER T WELVE C HAPTER T HIRTEEN C HAPTER F OURTEEN C HAPTER F IFTEEN C HAPTER S IXTEEN C HAPTER S EVENTEEN C HAPTER E IGHTEEN C HAPTER N INETEEN

1 5 11 16 20 25 32 39 50 54 58 66 73 79 84 90 99 108 120

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C HAPTER T WENTY C HAPTER T WENTY-O NE C HAPTER T WENTY-T WO C HAPTER TWENTY-T HREE C HAPTER T WENTY-F OUR C HAPTER T WENTY-F IVE C HAPTER T WENTY-S IX C HAPTER T WENTY-S EVEN C HAPTER T WENTY-E IGHT C HAPTER T WENTY-N INE C HAPTER T HIRTY C HAPTER T HIRTY-O NE C HAPTER T HIRTY-T WO C HAPTER T HIRTY-T HREE C HAPTER T HIRTY-F OUR C HAPTER T HIRTY-F IVE C HAPTER T HIRTY-S IX C HAPTER T HIRTY-S EVEN C HAPTER T HIRTY-E IGHT C HAPTER T HIRTY-N INE C HAPTER F ORTY C HAPTER FORTY-O NE C HAPTER F ORTY-T WO T HE C HAPTER L AST

129 138 148 154 160 166 174 182 189 198 208 212 221 227 234 240 247 253 260 267 273 279 286 294

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CHAPTER ONE

HUCKLEBERRY FINN
Scene: The Mississippi Valley Time: Forty to fifty years ago
ou don’t know about me, without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain’t no matter. That book was made byMr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth. That is nothing. I never seen anybody but lied one time or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Aunt Polly—Tom’s Aunt Polly, she is—and Mary, and the Widow Douglas is all told about in that book, which is mostly a true book, with some stretchers, as I saidbefore. Now the way that the book winds up is this: Tom and me found the money that the robbers hid in the cave, and it made us rich. We got six thousand dollars apiece—all gold. It was an awful sight of money when it was piled up. Well, Judge Thatcher he took it and put 1

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it out at interest, and it fetched us adollar a day apiece all the year round—more than a body could tell what to do with. The Widow Douglas she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize me; but it was rough living in the house all the time, considering how dismal regular and decent the widow was in all her ways; and so when I couldn’t stand it no longer I lit out. I got into my old rags and my sugar-hogshead again, and wasfree and satisfied. But Tom Sawyer he hunted me up and said he was going to start a band of robbers, and I might join if I would go back to the widow and be respectable. So I went back. The widow she cried over me, and called me a poor lost lamb, and she called me a lot of other names, too, but she never meant no harm by it. She put me in them new clothes again, and I couldn’t do nothing but sweat...
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